Regional Climate Change Predictions

(reprinted from the Seattle-based publication “Grist”; source of information: The 4th Climate Change Assessment – refer to: https://www.globalchange.gov/nca4 )

We need to know what’s happening, so we can be prepared. I’m not saying it’s time to start prepping your bunker, but I would like to know if my neighborhood should consider moving to higher ground or stock up on maple syrup.

 

The Dailey Sun~Chronicles

                               “No Rumors, No Fakes – Just the Facts, Jack!”

 

Volume VIII, Issue 43                                  6 – 25 – 2019                           ***** Edition

rainbow waterfall

Climate Change Predictions by “Grist”

~ What climate change will do, region by region according to

the National Climate Assessment of ’18

 

At this point, even the most stubborn among us know that climate change is coming for our asses. We really don’t have much time until the climate plagues we’re already getting previews of — mega-wildfires, rising sea-levels, superstorm after superstorm — start increasing in frequency. The 4th National Climate Assessment says all that and much more is on its way.

Not all regions in the U.S. are going to experience climate change in the same way. Your backyard might suffer different climate consequences than my backyard.

Luckily, that new report — which Trump tried to bury on Black Friday — breaks down climate change’s likely impacts on 10 specific regions. Unluckily, the chapters are super dense.

Silver lining: We at Grist divvied up the chapters and translated them into news you can actually use.

Northeast

Ahh, the Northeast, home to beautiful autumn leaves, delicious maple syrup, and copious amounts of ticks bearing disease. What’s not to love? A lot, according to this report.

Our region is looking at “the largest temperature increase in the contiguous United States” — 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit by the time 2035 rolls around. We’re going to be slammed with the highest rates of sea-level rise in the whole damn country, and we’re going to have the highest rate of ocean warming. Urban centers are particularly at risk (remember Superstorm Sandy?). And if you’re a fan of snuggling up beside the fire in your Connecticut mansion (or whatever), be warned that winters are projected to warm in our region three times faster than summers. That means delayed ski seasons and less time to tap maple trees.

Things are gonna be rough on us humans, but dragonflies and damselflies — two insects literally no one ever thinks about, but that flourish in healthy ecosystems — are pretty much doomed. The report says their habitat could decline by as much as 99 percent by 2080.

Sea-level rise, flooding, and extreme weather poses a mental health threat to Northeasterners. Impacted coastal communities can expect things like “anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder.” But it’s not all bad: The assessment portends more intense (read: Instagram-able) fall foliage and more forest growth.

Zoya Teirstein

Southeast

If, like me, you love your filthy, dirty South, you’ll be pleased to hear that summer thunderstorms, skeeters, ticks, and hot, muggy weather aren’t going anywhere! (Actually, don’t be pleased. This is serious.)

Southerners are accustomed to warm days followed by warm nights, but as the heat continues to turn up, those nights just might be our downfall. Urban and rural areas alike can expect to sweat through up to 100 additional warm nights per year by the end of this century. Hot, sticky nights make it harder for us to recover from the heat of the day. This is especially bad in parts of many Southeastern cities, where residents suffer from the “heat island effect.”

“I think it’s really important to look at the heat-related impacts on labor productivity,” says chapter author Kirstin Dow, a social environmental geographer at the University of South Carolina. Under one scenario, the Southeast could see losses of 570 million labor hours, amounting to about $47 billion per year — one-third of the nation’s total loss. What’s more, Dow says, “Those changes are going to take place in counties where there’s already chronic poverty.”

Warming waters will also push the infamous lionfish closer to the Atlantic Coast. In addition to being invasive, this freaky-looking fish is venomous, and swimmers and divers can expect more encounters (and stings) as the climate brings them closer to our beaches.

Claire Elise Thompson

Caribbean

For someone who doesn’t like donning heavy clothing during the winter, the Caribbean has the perfect weather: year-round warm days with ocean breezes. Climate change, according to the report, means we can’t have nice things.

In the near future, the Caribbean will experience longer dry seasons and shorter, but wetter rainy seasons. To make matters worse: During those arid periods, freshwater supplies will be lacking for islanders. And since islands (by definition) aren’t attached to any other land masses, “you can’t just pipe in water,” says Adam Terando, USGS Research Ecologist and chapter author.

The report confirmed something island-dwellers know all too well: Climate change is not coming to the Caribbean — it’s already there. And it’ll only get worse. Disastrous storms the likes of Hurricane Maria — which took the lives of nearly 3,000 Puerto Ricans — are expected to become more common in a warming world.

Another striking result: Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands are projected to lose 3.6 percent and 4.6 percent of total coastal land area, respectively, posing a threat to critical infrastructure near its shores. The tourism industry will have to grapple with the disappearance of its beaches. Even notable cultural sites aren’t safe: Encroaching seas threaten El Morro — a hulking fortress that sits majestically on the coast of San Juan, Puerto Rico.

“Our island is trying to limit its emissions — but we’re not big emitters,” lead chapter author Ernesto L. Diaz, a coastal management expert at Puerto Rico’s Dept. of Natural and Environmental Resources, tells Grist.

Paola Rosa-Aquino

Midwest

What’s in store for the Midwest? Oh hello there, crop diseases and pests! Hold onto your corn husks, because maize yields will be down 5 to 25 percent across the region by midcentury, mostly due to hot temps. And soybean hauls will decline more than 25 percent in the southern Midwest.

Beyond wilting crops, extreme heat puts lives at risk. The Midwest may see the biggest increase in temperature-related deaths compared to other regions, putting everyone from farmworkers to city-dwellers at risk. In one particularly bad climate change scenario, late-21st-century Chicago could end up seeing 60 days per year above 100 degrees F — similar to present-day Las Vegas or Phoenix.

The Great Lakes represent 20 percent of freshwater on the world’s surface, but lately, they’re looking … not so fresh. Climate change and pollution from farms are leading to toxic algae blooms and literally starving the water of oxygen.

But hey, there’s a silver lining. Midwesterners (myself included) have developed a bad habit of leaving their homeland for other parts of the country. That trend may reverse. “The Midwest may actually experience migration into the region because of climate change,” Maria Carmen Lemos, a Midwest chapter author and professor at the University of Michigan’s School for Environment and Sustainability, said in a statement. So while you may have to reconsider your ice-fishing plans, Midwesterners, it could be a whole lot worse.

Kate Yoder

Northern Great Plains

The Northern Great Plains is far from any ocean. Water melts off mountain snowpack, slowly trickles down glaciers, and pools up in basins. The largely arid region is dominated by thirsty industries like agriculture, energy extraction, and tourism. There’s a byzantine system of century-old water rights and competing interests.

Or as my dad, a Montana cattle rancher, puts it: “Whiskey is for drinking. Water is for fighting.”

Residents might want to steel themselves with a little bourbon as climate change will escalate those water woes, according to the report. Winters will end earlier and snow could decline as much as 25 to 40 percent in the mountainous regions.

It’s not just some far-off problem for cross-country skiers and thirsty critters. The authors point to the behavior of the mountain pine beetle as one example of a climate-influenced tweak that’s had devastating impact. Warmer winters and less precipitation have enabled the bugs to kill off huge swaths of forest in the region.

Lest you think what happens in the Dakotas stays in the Dakotas: While only 1.5 percent of the U.S. population lives in this region, it contributes nearly 13 percent of the country’s agricultural market value.

It’s culturally critical, too: The area is home to 27 federally recognized tribes that are already experiencing climate threats such as a lack of access to safe water and declining fisheries.

Darby Minow Smith

Southern Great Plains

The Southern Great Plains flips between heat waves, tornadoes, drought, ice storms, hurricanes, and hail. The weather is “dramatic and consequential” according to the report. It’s “a terrible place to be a hot tar roofer,” according to me, a former Kansas roofer. In a warmed world, none of this improves. Well, maybe the ice storms.

The region will continue to have longer and hotter summers, meaning more drought. Portions of the already shrinking Ogallala Aquifer, which is critical to a huge western swath of the region, could be completely depleted within 25 years, according to the report.

Texas’ Gulf Coast will face sea-level rise, stronger hurricanes, and an expanded range of tropical, mosquito-borne diseases like dengue and Zika. It’ll also experience more intense floods. Many of the region’s dams and levees are in need of repair and aren’t equipped for the inundations.

One of the chapter’s lead authors, Bill Bartush, a conservation coordinator with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, tells Grist that how landowners handle the extremes of water management will be key to climate adaptation. Given the region’s high rates of private land ownership, it’s essential to get them on board.

In weirder news, the region’s Southern Flounder population is declining because the fish’s sex is determined by water temperature. Warmer winters mean more males. It’s like a terrible reboot of Three Men and a Baby, but with more flounder and no baby.

Daniel Penner

Northwest

The Pacific Northwest has more rain in its winter forecast. That might not sound unusual for a region known for its wet weather, but more winter rain — as opposed to snow — could impact the region’s water supply and entire way of life.

Most of the Northwest relies on melting mountain snow for water during the summer. Climate change will replace more of that snow with rain, which flows downstream right away rather than being stored on mountainsides until the temperatures warm. Less snowmelt during hot summers could damage salmon habitat, dry out farms, harm the region’s outdoor industry, and increase wildfire risk.

“It’s like our tap is on all the time,” said Heidi Roop, a research scientist at the University of Washington Climate Impacts Group, which helped author the chapter.

The report forecasts a lot of change in the Northwest, including flooding and landslides. But rainy winters? That’s one thing that’s not going away anytime soon.

Jesse Nichols

Southwest

“I am large. I contain multitudes,” Walt Whitman said of himself. But he could have very well said it of the Southwest, where stretches of desert give way to soaring, snow-capped mountains. Yet this might not be the case for long. Climate change threatens all of this beautiful ecological diversity, as well as the 60 million people who call this area home, including 182 tribal nations.

The hottest and driest corner of the country is already suffering from heat waves, droughts, and increased wildfires. As a result, the Southwest, to put it bluntly, is running out of water. With water at already record low levels and a population that continues to grow, the region is working on a recipe for water scarcity.

“Lake Mead, which provides drinking water to Las Vegas and water for agriculture in the region, has fallen to its lowest level since the filling of the reservoir in 1936 and lost 60 percent of its volume,” coordinating chapter author Patrick Gonzalez, a climate scientist at the University of California, Berkeley, tells Grist.

In the coming years, temperatures in this region will soar. Droughts, including megadroughts lasting 10 years, will become commonplace. Agriculture will take a steep hit, causing food insecurity. Expect those lovely desert sunsets to take on an unsettling pink, as the snow-capped mountains grow bald.

Greta Moran

Alaska

In Alaska, water is life, life is shellfish, shellfish is power. But, alas, climate change is about to do a number on the state’s marine life, food webs, and species distributions. According to the climate assessment, ocean acidification is expected to disrupt “corals, crustaceans, crabs, mollusks,” as well as “Tanner and red king crab and pink salmon.” Lots of indigenous peoples rely on that variety of marine life.

The largest state in the country is already ground zero for climate change. Thawing permafrost means structures are literally sinking into the ground all over the state.

What does a temperature increase really mean? Well, under the worst-case scenario, the coldest nights of the year are projected to warm 12 DEGREES F by midcentury.

I know I said water, either frozen or liquid, is the name of the game in Alaska, but the report says the state should expect more wildfires in the future, too. Under a high-temperature-increase scenario, as much as 120 million acres could burn between 2006 and 2100. That’s an area larger than California.

Oh yeah, and the report says there’s going to be an increase in “venomous insects.” Cheers.

Zoya Teirstein

Hawaii and the Pacific Islands

This region houses 1.9 million people, 20 indigenous languages, countless endemic (one-of-a-kind) flora and fauna species, and the freaking Mariana Trench (the world’s deepest point).

Pacific island communities can expect to grapple with the usual climate change suspects: rising sea levels, weird rainfall patterns, drought, flooding, and extreme temperatures. But all those things have unique implications for supplies of island drinking water. In short, like those who live in the Caribbean, these communities’ ability to survive depends on protecting their fresh water.

Extremes in the weather patterns El Niño and La Niña could double in the 21st century, compared to the previous one. El Ninos bring drought, which means Pacific communities have to desalinate water to make up for dwindling rainfall. But rising sea levels contaminate groundwater supplies and aquifers, which basically means Pacific Islanders have it coming from all sides.

Wait, there’s more. Too much freshwater is bad, too. Under a higher-warming scenario, rainfall in Hawaii could increase by 30 percent in wet areas by the end of the century. Think that’s good for dry areas? Think again! Projections suggest rainfall decreases of up to 60 percent in those. So more rain where rain isn’t needed and less rain where it’s dry. Great.

To end things on a sad note — because why the hell not — the National Climate Assessment states that “nesting seabirds, turtles and seals, and coastal plants” are going to be whacked by climate change. 😦

Zoya Teirstein

 

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More Need for Gun Reform from Coast-to-Coast

 

True Stories from USA Today newspaper in late October and early November

“No Rumors, No Fakes – Just the Facts, Jack!”  and Why are minors being tried as adults?

The Dailey Sun~Chronicles

Volume VII, Issue 31                                   11 – 17 – 2018                         ***** Edition

 

Gun Control Gone Amuck in America

 First Along the North Atlantic Coast . . .

Dateline: Forsyth, Georgia

Authorities admit sheriff deputies fatally shot a 42-year-old woman confronting them with a pellet gun.

Dateline: Allentown, Pennsylvania

Police say the fatal shootings of two women stemmed from a family dispute.

Dateline: Hodges, South Carolina

Deputies say a 17-year-old shooting at a street sign accidently killed a man sitting at home on his front porch.

 

More from the South . . .

Dateline: St. Joseph, Tennessee

Authorities say a 10-year-old girl was accidently shot in the head by her twin brother.

 

Dateline: Birmingham, Alabama

A masked gunman was killed by a McDonald’s employee, who had opened up fire inside the restaurant.

 

Dateline: Dora, Alabama

Autopsy results show a city councilman fatally shot a woman then killed himself.

 

Dateline: Greenville, South Carolina

Police sought treatment for a pit bull who dug up a loaded .38-caliber pistol.

 

Dateline: Austin, Texas

State authorities announce that more than 200 school districts in Texas have adopted policies allowing staff to carry firearms.

 

Dateline: El Dorado, Arkansas

Two were killed and two others injured during an early Sunday morning shooting in their home.

                                                            =          =          =

 

In the North American Wild West . . .

Dateline: Cheyenne, Wyoming

A man convicted of 1st degree murder when he was 16 will soon be eligible for parole after serving 35 years in prison.

Dateline: Las Cruces, New Mexico

Tex Gilligan is recovering after he claims it was Charlie his Rottweiler dog, who shot him in the back after getting his paw caught in the trigger of a gun. They were out and about hunting for jackrabbits.

Dateline: Colorado Springs, Colorado

A 15-year-old who is accused of killing his mother and stepfather in Woodland Park. The minor will be tried as an adult.

Dateline: Helena, Montana

A good doctor died when his rifle discharged after he returned from a hunting trip.

Dateline: Fountain Hills, Arizona

92-year-old Anna Mae Blessing fatally shot her 72-year-old son, who wanted to place her in an assisted living facility.

Dateline: Lamar Township, Pennsylvania

A man and woman, believed to be “intoxicated on bath salts,” were shooting bullets into the sky to chase away alien lasers. The aliens actually were merely fireflies.

 

strikes again

Mass Shooting Fatality Statistics Since 1990

 

 

More in the American Heartland . . .

Dateline: St. Louis, Missouri

Retired 67-year-oldpolice Sgt. Harper is dead after a street shootout with another.

 

Dateline: Hebron, Nebraska

A 21-year-old is facing charges in connection with a fatal shooting of one man and wounding of his brother.

 

Dateline: West Valley City, Utah

A naked gunman is suspected of killing two people living in a trailer on the property behind his house.

 

Dateline: Chicago, Illinois

CPD officers seize an average of one illegal handgun per hour.

 

Dateline: Charlotte, North Caroline

A man was arrested for going on-line to hire a hit man.

 

                                                                        =          =          =

 

copyright MMXVIII – Max’s Scout Services & Communications of the Americas, LLC –

from Woodside, California 94062-2448

“The Dailey Sun~Chronicles”

 

 

Why are minors being tried as adults?

 

Must Legislatures See

More Evidence Supporting the Need for

Gun Control in the U.S.A. !?!

Trump is “Gaslighting” American Voters – Can the USA Survive?!?

Recognizing 11 Warning Signs of Gaslighting [ source: Psychology Today ]

Gaslighting is a manipulation tactic used to gain power and maintain it… And it works too well, as President Donald J. Trump and his staff know.

Gaslighting is a tactic in which a person or entity, in order to gain more power, makes a victim question their reality. It works much better than you may think.

Anyone is susceptible to gaslighting, and it is a common technique of abusers, dictators, narcissists, and cult leaders. It is done slowly, so the victim doesn’t realize how much they’ve been brainwashed. For example, in the movie Gaslight (1944), a man manipulates his wife to the point where she thinks she is losing her mind.

In the book Gaslighting: Recognize Manipulative and Emotionally Abusive People – and Break Free, there is detail how “gaslighters” typically use the following techniques:

  1. They tell blatant lies.

You know it’s an outright lie. Yet they are telling you this lie with a straight face. Why are they so blatant? Because they’re setting up a precedent. Once they tell you a huge lie, you’re not sure if anything they say is true. Keeping you unsteady and off-kilter is the goal.

Newspapers have lost track of how many mistruths and outright lies the Trump Administration have spoken.

  1. They deny they ever said something, even though you have proof. 

You know they said they would do something; you know you heard it. But they out and out deny it. It makes you start questioning your reality—maybe they never said that thing. And the more they do this, the more you question your reality and start accepting theirs. Blame is directed away from the gaslighter.

Nor will they take responsibility (i.e. terrorist activities motivated by the President’s angry speeches and comments to and about the press).

  1. They use what is near and dear to you as ammunition. 

They know how important your kids are to you, and they know how important your identity is to you. So those may be one of the first things they attack. If you have kids, they tell you that you should not have had those children. They will tell you’d be a worthy person if only you didn’t have a long list of negative traits. They attack the foundation of your being.

  1. They wear you down over time.

This is one of the insidious things about gaslighting—it is done gradually, over time. A lie here, a lie there, a snide comment every so often…and then it starts ramping up. Even the brightest, most self-aware people can be sucked into gaslighting—it is that effective. It’s the “frog in the frying pan” analogy: The heat is turned up slowly, so the frog never realizes what’s happening to it.

Trump has been at it for almost two years in the presidency.

  1. Their actions do not match their words.

When dealing with a person or entity that gaslights, look at what they are doing rather than what they are saying. What they are saying means nothing; it is just talk. What they are doing is the issue.

  1. They throw in positive reinforcement to confuse you. 

This person or entity that is cutting you down, telling you that you don’t have value, is now praising you for something you did. This adds an additional sense of uneasiness. You think, “Well maybe they aren’t so bad.” Yes, they are. This is a calculated attempt to keep you off-kilter—and again, to question your reality. Also look at what you were praised for; it is probably something that served the gaslighter.

Republicans act like the end justifies the means (getting to the end point; namely, getting votes).

  1. They know confusion weakens people. 

Gaslighters know that people like having a sense of stability and normalcy. Their goal is to uproot this and make you constantly question everything. And humans’ natural tendency is to look to the person or entity that will help you feel more stable—and that happens to be the gaslighter.

The Republican Party is after votes.

  1. They project.

They are a drug user or a cheater, yet they are constantly accusing you of that. This is done so often that you start trying to defend yourself, and are distracted from the gaslighter’s own behavior.

Projection is a common psychological defense mechanism.

  1. They try to align people against you.

Gaslighters are masters at manipulating and finding the people they know will stand by them no matter what—and they use these people against you. They will make comments such as, “This person knows that you’re not right,” or “This person knows you’re useless too.” Keep in mind it does not mean that these people actually said these things. A gaslighter is a constant liar. When the gaslighter uses this tactic it makes you feel like you don’t know who to trust or turn to—and that leads you right back to the gaslighter. And that’s exactly what they want: Isolation gives them more control.

  1. They tell you or others that you are crazy.

This is one of the most effective tools of the gaslighter, because it’s dismissive. The gaslighter knows if they question your sanity, people will not believe you when you tell them the gaslighter is abusive or out-of-control. It’s a master technique.

  1. They tell you everyone else is a liar.

By telling you that everyone else (your family, the media) is a liar, it again makes you question your reality. You’ve never known someone with the audacity to do this, so they must be telling the truth, right? No. It’s a manipulation technique. It makes people turn to the gaslighter for the “correct” information—which isn’t correct information at all.

The more you are aware of these techniques, the quicker you can identify them and avoid falling into the gaslighter’s trap.

President Trump is remarkable in his implementation of these gaslighting techniques; justifying his actions.

 

Questions and Answers signpost

copyright 2018

Max’s Scout Services & Communications of the Americas, LLC

– for musement only –

Congressional Reform Act Proposal

Congressional Reform Act of 2013

1A. Congressional candidates will not accept campaign funds from PACs and SuperPACs…

1. No Tenure / No Pension. A Congressman/woman collects a salary while in office and receives no pay when they’re out of office.

2. Congress (past, present & future) participates in Social Security. All funds in the Congressional retirement fund move to the Social Security system immediately. All future funds flow into the Social Security system, and Congress participates with the American people. It may not be used for any other purpose.

3. Congress can purchase their own retirement plan, just as all Americans do.

IMG_2449D.A.Dailey of Northern California

4. Congress will no longer vote themselves a pay raise. Congressional pay will rise by the lower of CPI or 3%.

5. Congress loses their current health care system and participates in the same health care system as the American people.

6. Congress must equally abide by all laws they impose on the American people.

7. All contracts with past and present Congressmen/women are void effective 12/31/13. The American people did not make this contract with Congressmen/women.

Congressmen/women made all these contracts for themselves. Serving in Congress is an honor, not a career. The Founding Fathers envisioned citizen legislators, so ours should serve their term(s), then go home and back to work.

If each person contacts a minimum of twenty people then it will only take three days for most people (in the U.S. ) to receive the message. Don’t you think it’s time?

Three Green Party Candidates for Congress in California

join the California Green Wave to support our three congressional candidates Kenneth Mejia (CD 34), Rodolfo Cortes Barragan (CD 40), and Laura Wells (CD 13).

These three California candidates have advanced to the 2018 General Election, so we have an historic opportunity to break through the duopoly and bring national attention to our Green values and priorities. If there was ever a time to put Greens in congress, it is NOW!

Our corporate-free Green Party doesn’t need billionaires and their corporations funding our campaigns. We can WIN with PEOPLE POWER!

We need YOU to join the Green Wave!

This is how we defeat big money, THREE Clean, Green Candidates at a time!

We are helping Kenneth Mejia build a team of 10,000 volunteers and campaigners nationwide and we need your help too. Los Angeles area volunteers can walk precincts and canvass, but you can also volunteer from anywhere in the country by phone banking, donating, and promoting Kenneth’s campaign on social media. Sign up to volunteer today: https://www.mejia4congress.com/volunteer

All three of our California candidates will be at Green Party Annual National Meeting in Salt Lake City this weekend to spread the word about our historic opportunity. You can watch the national meeting proceedings live-streamed on GP-US Facebook or Twitter.

Help spread the word! Share this message with Greens and other progressives, and share your photos and ideas with us on social media using the tags @GreenPartyCalifornia and #CAGreens

“Natural Shock” Performance-Presentation Outstanding in San Francisco

check out the website:
http://www.NaturalShocks.org

Review by Tony Dale.

Photograph of actress Maryssa Wanless by Tasi Alabastro.

. . . and check out the website of the playwright Lauren Gunderson, too.

Wanlass Headshot by Tasi Alabastro.JPG

 

Maryssa Wanless performed the one-woman play “Natural Shocks” on Monday night at PianoFIght in San Francisco. Produced by Utopia Theatre Project, Wanless’ performance was part of a nationwide participation of theatre activism to end gun violence. Written by Lauren Gunderson, one of today’s most prolific and successful screenwriters, “Natural Shocks” is based upon Shakespeare’s ‘Hamlet’ and that famous question of “to be or not to be.”

 

Gunderson was so shocked by the recent outburst of gun violence at Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida that it brought to mind the gun violence almost 20 years ago at Columbine High in Littleton, Colorado. She dedicated “Natural Shocks” play to be used as vehicle to help put an end to gun violence. All royalties and fees have been waived so that any theatre group or community who wanted to put on the 65-minute monologue could do so for free.

 

Making this as an opportunity for Utopia Theatre Project to not only raise funds for EveryTown for Gun Safety, a non-profit working to end gun violence, but also as a way for people to discuss this pressing issue.

 

The mood on Monday night at PianoFight was intense as the audience hung on every word that Wanlass powerfully delivered. Despite the play’s serious subject matter, humor at times prevailed.

 

Since Gunderson’s release of her play, performances and staged readings of “Natural Shocks” have been performed in many places all over the nation. Gunderson’s aim was to have it performed in all 50 states.

 

Wanless is the Artistic Director of Utopia Theatre Project and she has this to say, “I believe theatre is transformative because it has transformed me and the people I work with on a daily basis. Theatre asks its audiences and participants to extend their thinking beyond themselves and step into the experience of another person.”

 

After Wanlass was finished her thought-provoking performance there was a “Q & A” with the audience in which also included Director, Laura Jane Bailey.

 

While the venue at PianoFight only holds 50 people, the ability for important subjects and issues to be presented in an intimate theatrical space makes an impact. Utopia Theatre Project was founded in 2014 by emerging Japanese-American playwright, Anne Yumi Kobori because she believes in artist-produced live theatre as a unique and powerful form of human connection using the theatrical art form to invoke social change through the telling of non-traditional stories.

 

“Natural Shocks” is the fourth production in Utopia’s inaugural season and is certainly a unique theatrical experience. Yet, even more so is the fact that this was history in the making using theater as a form of social activism.

 

For more information about “Natural Shocks” at Utopia Theatre Project visit: UtopiaTheatreProject.com and for more about the project, “Natural Shocks” visit: https://www.naturalshocks.org

 

 

Max's Scout Services & Communications of the Americas WebBlog

Maryssa Wanless performed the one-woman play “Natural Shocks” on Monday night at PianoFIght in San Francisco. Produced by Utopia Theatre Project, Wanless’ performance was part of a nationwide participation of theatre activism to end gun violence. Written by Lauren Gunderson, one of today’s most prolific and successful screenwriters, “Natural Shocks” is based upon Shakespeare’s ‘Hamlet’ and that famous question of “to be or not to be.”

Wanlass Headshot by Tasi Alabastro.JPG

Gunderson was so shocked by the recent outburst of gun violence at Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida that it brought to mind the gun violence almost 20 years ago at Columbine High in Littleton, Colorado. She dedicated “Natural Shocks” play to be used as vehicle to help put an end to gun violence. All royalties and fees have been waived so that any theatre group or community who wanted to put on the 65-minute monologue could do so for free.

Making this as an opportunity…

View original post 335 more words

Sheriff Department Accused of Police Brutality of Senior, Disabled Man Inside Redwood City Jail

White, elderly, disabled man beaten by Sheriffs in San Mateo (CA)

Max's Scout Services & Communications of the Americas WebBlog

SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF SAN MATEO

DAVID A. DAILEY

Plaintiff,

vs.

COUNTY OF SAN MATEO

OFFICE OF THE SHERIFF

AND

COUNTY HEALTH SYSTEM

Defendant(s).

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Case No.: 1 8   C I V  0 1 7 3 3

 

COMPLAINT

HEARING DATE:  August 9, 2018

 

TIME:   9:00 a.m.

 

DEPT:   21

Judge:   To be determined

 

CAUSE OF ACTION(S)

In violation of California Penal Code Section 15385, County jailhouse officers brutally used excessive force injuring the Plaintiff.

Pursuant to California Government Code Sections 8201 and 8216, the County Sheriff and County Health System unlawfully detained, mistreated, and handled the Plaintiff.

The Plaintiff alleges Defendants severely injured and failed to provide prudent medical attention.

Proper medical attention was not offered at both the jailhouse and…

View original post 1,460 more words